vertiginously

December 3, 2008 at 11:39 am (Uncategorized)

vertiginous (adj.) – whirling; spinning; rotary

“It turns out the cause of poor tendony Mrs. R–‘s meltdown in the kitchen is that she has either a grandniece or removed cousin who’s doing some type of internship at Time, Inc., in the Time-Life Building or whatever it’s called, about which Mrs. R– and whoever she’s managed to call know only that it’s a vertiginously tall skyscraper someplace in New York City, and she’s out of her mind with worry…”

Wallace, David Foster. “The View From Mrs. Thompson’s.” Consider the Lobster. New York: Back Bay Books, 2007. p 139.

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gonfalon

December 3, 2008 at 9:35 am (Uncategorized)

gonfalon (n.) – a banner suspended from a crossbar, often with several streamers or tails

“More than a few large homes around Franklin Park or out on the east side even have enormous multistory flags hanging gonfalon-style down over their facades.”

Wallace, David Foster. “The View From Mrs. Thompson’s.” Consider the Lobster. New York: Back Bay Books, 2007. p 129.

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sine die

December 3, 2008 at 12:35 am (Uncategorized)

sine die (Latin) – without fixing a day for future action or meeting

“The American Conversation is an argument, after all, and way worse than our fear of error or anarchy or Gomorrahl decadence is our fear of theocracy or autocracy or any ideology whose project is not to argue or persuade but to adjourn the whole debate sine die.”

Wallace, David Foster. “Authority and American Usage.” Consider the Lobster. New York: Back Bay Books, 2007. p 121

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